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DynaMIT - 8 Reasons Why It's Worth It

If you’re a middle schooler starting to think about college applications, and especially if you are limited by funds or exposure, then today’s blog may be of particular benefit for you. This blog will take an in-depth look at the DynaMIT program for middle school STEM enthusiasts, who can and should apply, and how it can help you prepare for college and upskill yourself at the same time.


What is DynaMIT?

DynaMIT is a fully-funded, week-long, student-led STEM program for students from underrepresented backgrounds. This initiative was started by current students of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and aims to reduce the educational disparities in STEM fields. Intended for middle schoolers living in the Boston area, DynaMIT strives to teach critical thinking and STEM skills to students who may not have the opportunity or access to such programs due to economic factors. Here, you'll explore everything from basic programming to robotics, guided by some of the brightest minds at MIT.


How is DynaMIT structured?

DynaMIT offers a comprehensive and engaging curriculum designed to introduce students to a broad spectrum of technological fields over the span of a week. There are two options available to attend:

  • Week 1 - August 14th to 18th, hosting rising 6th and 7th graders.

  • Week 2 - August 21st to 25th, hosting rising 8th and 9th graders.

Both of these are hosted by the DynaMIT team at the MIT campus in Boston.

The program includes interactive workshops, team projects, and seminars led by current MIT students from various STEM programs who have volunteered to lead DynaMIT. For the entire week you’ll be spending the day at MIT, working in small groups with mentors on short experiments and challenges. Each week has its own capstone project, and each day’s activities revolve around a single STEM concept related to this capstone project. This can be anything from electromagnetism, to polymers, to forensics. The average day is hence a balance between workshops and activities, capstone project work, and of course socialization with your peers and mentors while experiencing the MIT campus.


Is it prestigious?

While DynaMIT has a limited application pool since it’s restricted only to Boston residents who can attend a day program and commute to MIT daily, it strives to maintain a selective admissions process. Being operated and led by current MIT students, who are themselves some of the sharpest minds in the country, adds its own layer of prestige to the program. Its structure also promotes small, intimate groups that provide for deeper learning and mentorship. However, it is important to note that it’s still effectively an introductory program that is intended for students from economically underrepresented households. So while it is slightly prestigious, its primary purpose is to get you started on the path to STEM rather than to make your resume truly stand out.


Who is eligible to apply?

All you need to be eligible for DynaMIT is to be a rising 6th, 7th, 8th or 9th grader studying within commuting distance of MIT. 


8 reasons why DynaMIT is worth it

  1. Head start on advanced topics: DynaMIT will take you over advanced STEM topics that are rarely covered at the middle school level.

  2. Zero cost of entry: Allows you to get a head start on your STEM education regardless of your household’s finances.

  3. An experience of the MIT campus: You’ll get to spend a week at one of the world’s leading tech institutions, which can be an inspiring experience if you’re serious about pursuing STEM.

  4. Start building a peer network: You’ll get to build friendships and networks with a diverse group of motivated students from various backgrounds.

  5. Helps you develop real-world skills: You’ll gain practical skills like critical thinking, communication, and presentation through project-based learning, preparing you for high school and beyond.

  6. Quality of mentorship: You’ll be learning directly from current MIT students, who are some of the smartest people in the country and future experts of their fields.

  7. Hands-on experiences: The curriculum encourages plenty of hands-on activities that enhance understanding and retention.

  8. Exposure to careers: By speaking to your MIT mentors, you’ll get a glimpse of potential career paths in the rapidly evolving tech industry.

Wrapping Up 

For ambitious middle schoolers eager to get a head start in STEM, DynaMIT offers a unique blend of education, mentorship, and hands-on experience that can be transformative. This program helps you build a strong foundation for your future career regardless of economic or generational barriers that you may otherwise face. If you live in the Boston area and have a deep interest in pursuing STEM in high school, DynaMIT is the place to start.



One more option - The Lumiere Junior Explorer Program

The Lumiere Junior Explorer Program is a program for middle school students to work one-on-one with a mentor to explore their academic interests and build a project they are passionate about.  Our mentors are scholars from top research universities such as Harvard, MIT, Stanford, Yale, Duke and LSE.


The program was founded by a Harvard & Oxford PhD who met as undergraduates at Harvard. The program is rigorous and fully virtual. We offer need based financial aid for students who qualify. You can find the application in the brochure


To learn more, you can reach out to our Head of Partnerships, Maya, at maya.novak-herzog@lumiere.education or go to our website.


Multiple rolling deadlines for JEP cohorts across the year, you can apply using this application link! If you'd like to take a look at the cohorts + deadlines for 2024, you can refer to this page!


Stephen is one of the founders of Lumiere and a Harvard College graduate. He founded Lumiere as a PhD student at Harvard Business School. Lumiere is a selective research program where students work 1-1 with a research mentor to develop an independent research paper.


Image Source: MIT logo


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